Read Time:20 Minute, 38 Second

Watch Snowpiercer (2013), Story, Stars, Reviews & All You Want to Know About a Great Movie

 

Snowpiercer (2013)

In a future where a failed climate change experiment has killed all life except for the survivors who boarded the Snowpiercer (a train that travels around the globe), a new class system emerges.

Snowpiercer (2013) Trailer

 

Snowpiercer (2013) Reviews

Based on the French graphic novel “La Transperceneige,” Bong Joon-ho’s “Snowpiercer” begins in the extremely not-too-distant future as mankind launches a final attempt to halt the spread of global warming once and for all. Needless to say, the plan backfires spectacularly and plunges the world into a new ice age that causes the extinction of all life forms.Luckily, before all this happened, wealthy industrialist Wilford (an inspired bit of casting that I dare not reveal), taking several pages from Ayn Rand, constructed a high-speed luxury train that can circle the globe without stopping or suffering the effects of the weather outside. Now, humanity’s last remnants reside on the train—the well-to-do people living in comfort in the head cars with the poor and downtrodden masses stuck in back in cramped quarters and forced to subsist on protein bars made from…well, don’t ask what goes into the protein bars.

After seventeen years of subhuman conditions, the people in back are about to explode and Curtis (Chris Evans) is elected to lead the charge, albeit reluctantly. There have been failed insurrections in the past but old-timer Gilliam (John Hurt) has an idea—one of the prisoners placed in cryogenic sleep, Namgoong (Kang-ho Song), was one of the train’s original engineers before turning into a junkie and knows how to override the complicated system of locked doors to help with the forward progress.After realizing that the armed guards sent by Wilford’s right-hand woman Mason (a nearly unrecognizable Tilda Swinton) are not as threatening as they seem, Curtis and Namgoong, along with a party that includes Edgar (Jamie Bell), Tanya (Octavia Spencer) and Namgoong’s daughter Yona (An-sung Ko), set off for the head of the train and a final confrontation with Wilford to determine their fates. (Again, if you have any sense of surprise, do not look up the identity of the person playing Wilford.)

If the name “Gilliam” set off a little tremor of excitement when you heard it that is no accident because, with its combination of startling visuals, a head-spinning storyline and oddball characters that don’t always conform to their presumed parameters, “Snowpiercer” is a film definitely in the vein of the works of the great Terry Gilliam, especially his 1985 landmark “Brazil” (which, funnily enough, also had a distributor that was originally unwilling to release it without massive cuts).

However, while Bong may owe Gilliam a debt of inspiration, this is no copycat effort by any means. In his earlier films, Bong has demonstrated a knack for taking standard generic premises and twisting them around in new and unusual ways that entertain genre expectations while subverting them at every turn. Even though the idea of watching people trying to push their way through an unstoppable train may seem to have certain visual and dramatic limitations, he and co-writer Kelly Masterson always manage to keep things interesting.

From a visual perspective, “Snowpiercer” is never less than stunning as it provides thrilling images ranging from the desolate landscape outside (complete with the occasional body still frozen in mid-step) to a full-size aquarium with beauty that is outdone only by its implausibility.

Despite the close quarters, Bong also comes up with a number of inventively-staged action sequences, the most memorable of which include a first-person look at a savage brawl in a completely dark car as seen through a pair of night-vision glasses and a visit to a classroom run by a teacher (Alison Pill) with an unexpected lesson plan. From a dramatic standpoint, the film is equally effective in the way that it includes the expected pulpy thrills and weirdo humor but also some unexpectedly affecting dramatic moments.

There is one moment in which a character remarks that, because of conditions on the train, “I know what people taste like and I know babies taste best.” It sounds like a sick joke but the line is delivered with the utmost seriousness, and, because we care about who is saying it, it turns out to be an unexpectedly powerful moment of human drama amidst the chaos. Likewise, the film’s final shot is impressive in the way that it suggests triumph and potential terror at the same time.

Speaking of simultaneous triumph and terror, the mere act of seeing “Snowpiercer”  may prove to be a bit difficult. As some of you may have heard, the film has been at the center of a feud between its director and Harvey Weinstein, the film’s distributor. According to reports, Weinstein disliked Bong’s 126-minute cut and allegedly demanded the removal of 20 minutes before he would release it.Eventually, Weinstein relented and kept the film at its full length but decided to instead slash its distribution plan to what the kids refer to as a “limited release,” which means that unless it becomes a surprise smash warranting a bigger run, there is an excellent chance that many people will never even get the chance to see it on the big screen where it really needs to be viewed in order for it to have maximum impact. Yes, this is how Hollywood really works these days and no, I don’t get it either.

  • Peter Sobczynski –  Roger Ebert
  • Peter Sobczynski is a contributor to eFilmcritic.com and Magill’s Cinema Annual and can be heard weekly on the nationally syndicated “Mancow’s Morning Madhouse” radio show.

Watch Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 (2011), Story, Stars, Reviews & All You Want To Know About A Great Movie

 

Snowpiercer (2013) Credits

Snowpiercer movie poster

Snowpiercer (2014)

Rated R for violence, language and drug content

126 minutes

Cast

Chris Evans as Curtis

Jamie Bell as Edgar

John Hurt as Gilliam

Tilda Swinton as Mason

Alison Pill as schoolteacher

Octavia Spencer as Tanya

Ewen Bremner as Andrew

Director

  • Joon-ho Bong

Screenplay

  • Joon-ho Bong
  • Kelly Masterson

Original Music Composer

  • Marco Beltrami

Original Story

  • Jacques Lob
  • Benjamin Legrand
  • Jean-Marc Rochette

Screenstory

  • Joon-ho Bong

Director of Photography

  • Kyung-Pyo Hong

Watch John Wick 3 – Parabellum (2019), Story, Stars, Reviews & All You Want To Know About A Great Movie

 

Snowpiercer (2013) Plot

In 2031, 17 years after an attempt to stop global warming via stratospheric aerosol injection catastrophically backfires and creates a new ice age, the remnants of humanity have taken to a self-sustaining circumnavigational train, the Snowpiercer, run by reclusive transportation magnate Wilford. The passengers on the train are segregated, with the elite in the extravagant front cars and the poor crammed into squalid tail compartments overseen by armed guards.

Urged by his father-figure, Gilliam, Curtis Everett and his second-in-command, Edgar, lead the tail passengers in a revolt after they realize the guards’ weapons have no ammunition; bullets are believed to be extinct due to a previous revolt. They free Namgoong Minsoo, a captive security specialist, who insists that his clairvoyant daughter, Yona, be freed as well. Namgoong helps the tail mob progress forward, but they find themselves facing guards with melee weapons, overseen by Minister Mason.

During the battle, the train goes into a tunnel, causing total darkness. The guard force, who have night vision, begin picking off the blind rebels. However, the tail-sectioners launch a counterattack with torches and push the guards back. Edgar is held hostage, but Curtis abandons him to capture Mason, forcing her to order the remaining guards to surrender while Edgar is fatally stabbed.

The tail army stays back, holding the guards captive, while Curtis takes Mason, Namgoong, Yona, skilled fighter Grey, and Tanya and Andrew (two parents who have had their children taken from them) toward the front of the train.

Curtis’s group travels through several opulent cars. Namgoong and Yona recognize a landmark outside and consider that the ice may be thawing. The group reaches a schoolroom, where a teacher is indoctrinating the children on Wilford’s greatness. A bald man brings eggs for the children to open to celebrate the eighteenth circumnavigation of the Earth. The bald man goes to the tail army and shoots them with loaded automatic guns hidden under the eggs, revealing that bullets still exist.

The captured guards are freed, as is Mason’s henchman Franco. The teacher, who received a gun from the bald man, kills Andrew before Grey kills her. Franco broadcasts to the classroom his execution of Gilliam, this prompts Curtis to kill Mason. Curtis’s group moves on, but Franco catches up with them, killing Grey and Tanya. Franco is seemingly killed by Curtis and Namgoong. The two, along with Yona, continue onward.

In the last car before the engine, Namgoong reveals that the reason he collected the drug Kronole was to use it as an explosive to escape the train with Yona, believing they can survive. Curtis stops them, as he wants to meet Wilford; Curtis explains that in the early days of the train, 17 years before, the tail section had resorted to cannibalism, and he had been ready to eat the infant Edgar but Gilliam offered him his arm instead.

Curtis wants to face Wilford to ask why he created this closed ecosystem. The engine door opens, and Wilford’s assistant Claude emerges and wounds Namgoong before inviting Curtis inside.

Curtis meets Wilford and, to his shock, learns that he and Gilliam conspired to stage Curtis’s rebellion to reduce the tail section’s population to sustainable levels. Wilford orders 74% of the tail passengers killed. He then offers Curtis his position leading the train. Curtis appears ready to accept when Yona overpowers Claude, rushes in, and pulls open a floorboard to reveal Andrew and Tanya’s children, Andy and Timmy, working the engine as slaves.

Appalled, Curtis knocks out Wilford and rescues Timmy from the machinery, though he loses his arm in the process. Curtis gives Yona matches to light the fuse for the Kronole, while Namgoong fights and kills Franco, who had followed them, along with partygoers from another car. As the door to the engine room will not close, Curtis and Namgoong use their bodies to protect Yona and Timmy from the blast.

The explosion triggers an avalanche that derails and wrecks the train. With Namgoong unresponsive, Yona escapes the wreckage with Timmy. They see a polar bear in the distance, indicating that life exists outside the train. The bear notices them.

Watch Avengers: Endgame (2019), Story, Stars, Reviews & All You Want To Know About A Great Movie

 

Snowpiercer (2013) Box office

Between its South Korean opening on 27 June 2014 and 23 October 2014, the film earned US$86.7 million worldwide. As of April 2014, it was the tenth highest-grossing domestic film in South Korea with 9.35 million admissions. The film holds the domestic record for the fastest movie (domestic and foreign) to reach four million admissions, which it achieved in its fifth day after premiere, and another record for the highest weekend figure (from Friday to Sunday) for a Korean film, with 2.26 million viewers.

The film took in $171,000 on its US opening weekend, averaging around $21,400 per theater. The film grossed US$59.8 million in South Korea and its largest international market was China, with $11.1 million.

Watch Jungle Cruise (2021), Story, Stars, Reviews & All You Want To Know About A Great Movie

 

Snowpiercer (2013) Critical Response

Film review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes reports that 94% of critics gave the film a positive rating, based on 261 reviews with an average score of 8.1/10. The website’s critical consensus states, “Snowpiercer offers an audaciously ambitious action spectacle for filmgoers numb to effects-driven blockbusters.” Metacritic assigned the film a weighted average score of 84 out of 100, based on 38 reviews from mainstream critics, considered to be “universal acclaim”.

Chris Nashawaty of Entertainment Weekly gave the piece an “A” rating, stating, “Snowpiercer sucks you into its strange, brave new world so completely, it leaves you with the all-too-rare sensation that you’ve just witnessed something you’ve never seen before … and need to see again.”

A. O. Scott wrote, in his review for The New York Times, “Planetary destruction and human extinction happen a half-dozen times every summer. It’s rarely this refreshing, though.” Andrew Pulver of The Guardian scored the film most positively, writing, “Snowpiercer works brilliantly, the sum of extremely disparate parts that adds up to cinematic excellence.”

Joshua Rothkopf of Time Out New York scored the film five out of five stars, writing, “Sprung from a 1982 French graphic novel and bearing its era’s trickle-down tensions, Snowpiercer is a headlong rush into conceptual lunacy—but you’ll love it anyway.” Rothkopf praises Joon-ho, stating, “… Bong grabs onto the grungy conventions of postapocalyptic adventure with relish. He serves up claustrophobic action scenes (one largely shot in the dark) and ominous, messianic overtones as the band of rebels makes its way forward.”

Lou Lumenick of The New York Post gave the film high acclaim, writing, “Don’t miss it—this is enormously fun visionary filmmaking, with a witty script and a great international cast.”

He added, “The beautifully designed train is one of the most memorable in screen history …” David Denby of The New Yorker spoke highly of the piece, stating it to be, “Violent, often absurd, but full of brilliant surprises, while Bong keeps the center of the action moving toward the front of the train, a considerable feat of camera placement, choreographed mayhem, and cohesive editing,” and praising Nekvasil’s production design, “Bong and [Nekvasil], provide them with a series of sybaritic astonishments.”

Clarence Tsui of The Hollywood Reporter wrote a highly positive review, commenting, “Snowpiercer is still an intellectually and artistically superior vehicle to many of the end-of-days futuristic action thrillers out there.” Speaking highly of Bong’s film-making, Tsui wrote, “Bong’s vivid depictions—aided by Ondřej Nekvasil’s production design, Hong Kyung-pyo’s cinematography and Steve M. Choe’s editing—are exceptional.”

David Thomson of The New Republic remarked that “The most bracing and liberating thing about Joon-ho Bong’s Snowpiercer is not just its lyrical forward motion, but the exuberance with which the film revels in its plot predicament.” He furthers praises Nekvasil’s “progression of design set-pieces” and Tilda Swinton’s performance, saying “She is the life and soul of this riotous party, and you will be sad to see her disposed of, no matter that Mason’s ghastly manner has earned it.”

Scott Foundas of Variety wrote, “An enormously ambitious, visually stunning and richly satisfying futuristic epic from the gifted Korean genre director Bong Joon-ho.” Foundas added that Beltrami’s original score was “among the generally impeccable craft contributions [to the film].”

James Rocchi of Film.com wrote that, “If the film has one element that never flags or falters, it’s Evans.”

Some were more critical of the film. Jordan Adler of We’ve Got This Covered wrote “We leave Snowpiercer more exhausted with questions than invigorated by its unique vision and style. It is a formidable example of directorial control bogged down by poor writing, half-finished effects work and a rather thin exploration of a fascinating dystopian universe.”

Ann Hornaday of The Washington Post found otherwise potentially good acting to be “virtually lost in a tonal mishmash that can never decide between thoughtful political metaphor, lightheartedness and pulverizing violence” and went on to describe the director’s “tiresome, slow-motion fetishism, mixing costumes and weaponry in an effort to distract from the scenes’ sheer repetitiveness.”

In 2020, Snowpiercer was ranked by The Guardian number 8 among the classics of modern South Korean Cinema. The film appeared on several critics’ lists of the ten best films of 2014.

 

Snowpiercer (2013) Accolades

Awards and nominations
Award Date of ceremony Category Recipients Result
Alliance of Women Film Journalists[170] 12 January 2015 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Won
Asia-Pacific Film Festival[171] 13 December 2013 Best Director Bong Joon-ho Won
Best Supporting Actor Song Kang-ho Nominated
Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
Best Cinematography Hong Kyung-pyo Nominated
Best Editing Steve M. Choe, Changju Kim Nominated
Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil Nominated
Best Sound Design Choi Tae-young Nominated
Asian Film Awards[172] 27 March 2014 Best Film Park Chan-wook, Lee Tae-hun, Jeong Tae-sung, Steven Nam Nominated
Best Director Bong Joon-ho Nominated
Best Screenwriter Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson Nominated
Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil Nominated
Best Costume Designer Catherine George Nominated
Austin Film Critics Association Awards[173] 17 December 2014 Top 10 Films Runner-up
Baeksang Arts Awards[174] 27 May 2014 Best Film Nominated
Best Director Bong Joon-ho Won
Best Supporting Actress Go Ah-sung Nominated
Most Popular Actress Go Ah-sung Nominated
Black Reel Awards[175] 22 February 2015 Outstanding Supporting Actress Octavia Spencer Nominated
Blue Dragon Film Awards[176] 22 November 2013 Best Film Nominated
Best Director Bong Joon-ho Won
Best Supporting Actress Go Ah-sung Nominated
Best Cinematography Kyung-pyo Hong Nominated
Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil Won
Best Technical Aspect (Editing) Steve M. Choe, Changju Kim Nominated
Best Technical Aspect (Special Effects) Eric Durst Nominated
Boston Online Film Critics Association[177] 6 December 2014 Best Picture Won
Top 10 Films Won
Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Won
Busan Film Critics Awards[178] 1 November 2013 Best Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson Won
Central Ohio Film Critics Association[179] 8 January 2015 Best Film Runner-up
Best Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson Runner-up
Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Won
Actor of the Year Tilda Swinton (also for The Grand Budapest HotelOnly Lovers Left Alive, and The Zero Theorem) Runner-up
Chicago Film Critics Association[180] 15 December 2014 Best Art Direction Ondřej Nekvasil Nominated
Critics’ Choice Movie Awards[181] 15 January 2015 Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie Nominated
Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
Best Art Direction Ondřej Nekvasil, Beatrice Brentnerova Nominated
Detroit Film Critics Society[182] 19 December 2014 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
Director’s Cut Awards[183] 15 August 2014 Best Director Bong Joon-ho Won
Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Association[184] 1 March 2015 Unsung Film of the Year Nominated
Visually Striking Film of the Year Nominated
Georgia Film Critics Association[185] 9 January 2015 Best Picture Nominated
Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Won
Best Adapted Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson, Jacques Lob, Benjamin Legrand, Jean-Marc Rochette Nominated
Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil, Catherine George Nominated
Gold Derby Film Awards[186] 19 February 2015 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil Nominated
Golden Tomato Awards[187] 6 January 2015 Best Limited Release Film Runner-up
Best Comic Book/Graphic Novel Film Won
Gotham Awards[177] 1 December 2014 Tribute Award Tilda Swinton (also for Only Lovers Left Alive, and The Grand Budapest Hotel) Won
Grand Bell Awards[188] 1 November 2013 Best Film Nominated
Best Director Bong Joon-ho Nominated
Best Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson Nominated
Best Supporting Actress Go Ah-sung Nominated
Best Cinematography Hong Kyung-pyo Nominated
Best Editing Steve M. Choe, Changju Kim Won
Best Art Direction Ondřej Nekvasil Won
Iowa Film Critics[189] 6 January 2015 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Runner-up
Houston Film Critics Society[190] 23 December 2014 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
International Cinephile Society Awards[191] 23 February 2014 Best Picture Not Released In 2013 Won
International Cinephile Society Awards[192] 20 February 2015 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Runner-up
Best Adapted Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson Nominated
Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil Nominated
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Awards[193] 18 December 2014 Top 10 Films Won
Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Won
Los Angeles Film Critics Association[194] 7 December 2014 Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil Runner-up
National Board of Review Awards[195] 6 January 2015 Top 10 Independent Films Won
North Carolina Film Critics Association[196] 5 January 2015 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson Nominated
Online Film Critics Society[197] 15 December 2014 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson Nominated
Online Film & Television Association[198] 8 February 2015 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson Nominated
Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil Nominated
Phoenix Film Critics Society[199] 16 December 2014 Overlooked Film of the Year Nominated
Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil Nominated
San Francisco Film Critics Circle[200] 14 December 2014 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
Best Adapted Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson Nominated
Best Production Design Ondřej Nekvasil Nominated
Satellite Awards[201] 15 February 2015 Best Actress in a Supporting Role Tilda Swinton Nominated
Best Sound Anna Behlmer, Mark Holding, Taeyoung Choi, Terry Porter Nominated
Best Visual Effects Eric Durst Nominated
Saturn Awards 25 June 2015 Best Action or Adventure Film Nominated
Southeastern Film Critics Association[202] 23 December 2014 Top 10 Films Won
Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Runner-up
St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association[203] 15 December 2014 Best Art Direction Ondřej Nekvasil Nominated
Toronto Film Critics Association[204] 16 December 2014 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Runner-up
South Korean Film Critics Awards[205] 18 November 2013 Best Film Won
Best Director Bong Joon-ho Won
Best Cinematography Hong Kyung-pyo Won
Sydney Film Festival[206] 15 June 2014 Best Film Nominated
Utah Film Critics Association[207] 17 December 2014 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Runner-up
Best Adapted Screenplay Bong Joon-ho, Kelly Masterson (tied with Paul Thomas Anderson for Inherent Vice) Won
Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Awards[208] 8 December 2014 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Nominated
Best Art Direction Ondřej Nekvasil, Beatrice Brentnerova Nominated
World Soundtrack Awards[209] 25 October 2014 Film Composer of the Year Marco Beltrami Nominated
Village Voice Film Poll[210] 8 February 2015 Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton Runner-up

Snowpiercer (2013) Movie Info

A post-apocalyptic ice age forces humanity’s last survivors aboard a globe-spanning supertrain. One man (Chris Evans) will risk everything to lead a revolt for control of the engine and the future of the world.

 

Watch Snowpiercer (2013)

vudu

Rent/buy

 

amazon-prime-video-us

Rent/buy

 

itunes

Rent/buy

 

Snowpiercer (2013) Pictures

https://vidtube.top

https://vidtube.top
https://vidtube.top
https://vidtube.top
https://vidtube.top

Snowpiercer  Snowpiercer    Snowpiercer  Snowpiercer  Snowpiercer  Snowpiercer

Follow us:

Facebook    

Lebanon Magazine        The Magazine

Instagram   

Movies & Series Show 

Twitter

Liberty Magazine Lebanon

Snowpiercer  Snowpiercer    Snowpiercer  Snowpiercer  Snowpiercer  Snowpiercer

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Reply

Watch X Men (2000), Story, Stars, Reviews & All You Want To Know About A Great Movie Previous post Watch X Men (2000), Story, Stars, Reviews & All You Want To Know About A Great Movie
Watch Home Alone (1990), Story, Stars, Reviews & All You Want to Know About a Great Movie Next post Watch Home Alone (1990), Story, Stars, Reviews & All You Want to Know About a Great Movie
Close
%d bloggers like this: